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TOPIC: Newbie - ID help please

Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14011

Hi there,
Bought my first Bonsai tree the other day and I'm having a little trouble identifying it. I've had a look through the species guide and I 'think' it might be a Chinese elm but I'm not entirely sure.
Would love to hear from some seasoned vets. :cheer:
Thanks

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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14012

Well done for getting that close ;) . It is a zelkova in my eyes. If not then a chinese elm. But in both cases keep it outside, water when the soil starts to feel dry. Do not feed now, start feeding in spring with any multipurpose fertiliser and stop feeding in late autumn (please don't get chicken manure) . I am leaning to think it is a zelkova due to the leaves being a bit more elongated.
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14014

bob wrote: Well done for getting that close ;)



Actually I think he's right.
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14015

He could be. But if you look at the leaves, to me anyway, they are more serrated and longer than a chinese elm (mine anyway). Zelkova and chinese elm 'ay, should be a spot the difference game :D . This is just my opinion though, so it could be a chinese elm. The best thing is that whether it is a zelkova or chinese elm, it does not matter much as they both demand very similar care.
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14018

Might I advise caution here - regardless of species, if it's a recent purchase and thus probably not acclimatised to outdoors then, depending on where in the world Melonman resides, it may be worth keeping indoors until Spring, in a cool and well lit location.

Dave
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14034

Thanks for the replies all! I'm based in Queensland Australia so its summer here at the moment. It gets quite hot and humid most days.
So far I have been keeping it in my window sill (the sun rise hits my window strong in the mornings) for the most part while putting it outside an hour or two in the sun after giving it some water. I read somewhere a way of checking the soil dryness is by using a chopstick so I've been checking it by putting a thin wooden skewer in the soil and leaving it for a bit, though this way seems like it could potentially cause damage to the roots. Would it be best to go out and get a PH level reader? I have yet to feed it - can anyone recommend a good food for it?
Thanks again!
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14035

NO you do not need a pH reader! I would have it outside all the time use a chopstick to check every day and water when almost dry. Don't allow it to dry completely. As you have just the one it is easiest to put into the sink of water and when the bubbes stop take it out and allow to drain. It will not damage the roots, but don't be skimpy with the water. Little and often is not the way. Just push the stick in and pull out if it is clean you need to water, simple as that. You are unlikely to overwater, but could easily underwater.
As for fertiliser any low nitrogen fertiliser will do fine, at this time of year for you, once every two weeks should be enough, just do as it says on the box.
Geoff.
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14059

Thanks for the advice Geoff. Appreciate it! Will do that
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14067

bob wrote: (please don't get chicken manure)


Why not? I have been using it all last year on all my plants. No problems whatsoever.
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Newbie - ID help please 3 years 11 months ago #14070

Yes, but i just sits on the surface of the soil, it stinks, can attract pests... I am not saying it is a bad feed, just that you can get better feeds that are cheaper and last longer. I mean, it just festers there. Only my opinion though, :) .
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