Many Japanese and Chinese forms of art are closely related to Bonsai, including Suiseki (stone appreciation), Ikebana (flower arrangement), Nishikigoi (Koi fish), Japanese gardening and pottery.

Inspirational trees

The art of growing Bonsai trees originates in the Chinese Empire, and like many related art-forms, the Japanese copied and adapted it during the Kamakura period. These related art forms include stone appreciation (Suiseki), keeping koi fish (Nishikigoi) and Japanese gardening. Let's investigate these arts in more detail!

小品盆栽 & 豆盆栽 - Shohin means “a small thing”, indicating it being even smaller than Bonsai. Although no exact rules were ever formulated, a tree is considered to be Shohin when under 25 cm (10’’) tall.

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錦鯉 - Nishikigoi, often called Koi fish or Japanese carp, are fish with colors and patches raised and kept for appreciation. The carp originates from China and was brought to Japan by means of gifts.

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盆栽鉢 - Bonsai literally means “planted in container”, which clearly indicates the importance and inseparability of pottery and Bonsai.

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生け花 - Ikebana (literally "giving life to flowers") is the Japanese art of flower arrangement, in which the arrangement brings nature and humanity closer together.

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水 - Suiseki is the Japanese art of stone appreciation, which values aspects like stability, longevity and immortality. Formed through time by wind and water, stones can take several sizes and shapes, reminding us of natural objects.

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日本庭園 - Japanese gardens are often part of Buddhist monasteries and Shinto shrines and therefore deeply rooted in religion. The importance of nature in Shinto beliefs is resembled in garden elements such as lakes, trees and rocks; Buddhist elements include mountains, stone groupings and seas.

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草もの - Bonsai trees are sometimes traditionally displayed in a Tokonoma, consisting of a Bonsai tree, a scroll and an accent plant (representing men, heaven and earth respectively).

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Online Bonsai courses

Bonsai beginners guide ebook

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