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TOPIC: Wilt Pruf and Yamadori

Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #14988

Has anyone had any success using "Wilt Pruf" or similar products to help limit transplant shock in recently collected trees? It is supposed to limit leaf transpiration (water loss) allowing more time to let the roots recuperate. Any experiences with the stuff would be helpful.

Thanks,

Chris
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #14989

I have not heard of it but I have collected a few small shrubs (not many, from hedges where the owners were doing work on their front garden and did not want stuff in their front garden) without any kind of spray stuff. I do not think you would need it. I would just give the best care possible to any collected plants and put them under a bit of shelter.
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #14992

If the tree is potted properly, and looked after there is no need for anything like this. Sounds like an expensive marketing ploy.
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #14993

"The proven anti-transpirant for over 60 year" :dry:

Maybe good for when you go out ;)
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #14994

I have heard people using this, or other foliage coatings. From a plant fysiology perspective it makes sense: Especially if you are moving older plants with little roots the main challenge is keeping the plant hydrated while it makes new roots. A coating on the foliage may help.

I have heard people using leaf gloss, often used in ornamental plants indoors to make the leafs shiny. Effectively it blocks the pores, reducing gass exchange. It could help; I often place plants that are struggling in a greenhouse with raised humidity to help plants.
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #14996

Perhaps adding some salt or salty water in a small percentage (not too much) to the leaves will help.
By adding salt you raise the osmotic levels which 'pulls' the water towards itself. That way you reduce the vaporization in the leaves.
Lb, I don't understand why one would reduce gas exchange since the most gas exchanging is CO2 and O2. Could you explain this?
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #14997

Contrainer wrote: Perhaps adding some salt or salty water in a small percentage (not too much) to the leaves will help.
By adding salt you raise the osmotic levels which 'pulls' the water towards itself. That way you reduce the vaporization in the leaves.


Would that not draw water out of the leaves, as the osmotic levels outside the cells will be higher than the levels inside?
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #15001

Yes Auk, adding salt to the leaves is reverse of what you want.

The water loss of a plant is mainly through the pores. Most leaf surface is impermeable to water. H2O is also a gas, when lost through the leavepores.
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #15002

Auk wrote:

Contrainer wrote: Perhaps adding some salt or salty water in a small percentage (not too much) to the leaves will help.
By adding salt you raise the osmotic levels which 'pulls' the water towards itself. That way you reduce the vaporization in the leaves.


Would that not draw water out of the leaves, as the osmotic levels outside the cells will be higher than the levels inside?


Ahh, okay, I now see my mistake. Forgot about the cellmembrane being semi-permeable..
So, then watering with destilled water is what we want since it tugescents the vacuole, right?
Thanks for explaining.
One last question; if you stop/reduce gas exchange, wouldn't the photosynthesis stop too since CO2 is required?
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Wilt Pruf and Yamadori 2 years 10 months ago #15003

Yup. Horrible trade-off. It won't be blocked completely, I presume. But yeah, I expect less growth. Which is why I put mine in a greenhouse. But I have heard of people spraying their trees with wax-like substances to reduce evapotranspiration of trees.
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