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Post-repotting Questions! 5 months 2 weeks ago #57515

  • Swanneck
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Hello, I have recently repotted my 5 year old Chinese elm and have a few questions I can't seem to find the answer for through my research.

Firstly just before this winter the plant was undercared for due to a big move to another country and was left outside during dry and cold days/nights. For that reason I have let her grow without much pruning as didn't want to stress it out further. Now I have repotted (successfully I think) as new growth is appearing, can I start to prune? Or hold off for autumn?

Secondly I can't seem to find much information on watering post repotting. Do I hold off on regular root drenching until the 4 week shade break is over? Or keep watering as per usual. FYI, the soil is damp as required I'm not drying her out! ☺

Thanks in advance!
Swan

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Post-repotting Questions! 5 months 2 weeks ago #57516

  • m5eaygeoff
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It should be outside. If it is making new growth then once it has elongated it can be pruned, as for watering there is no difference, water when needed. Mine are always in full sun no need for shading.
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Post-repotting Questions! 5 months 2 weeks ago #57530

  • Clicio
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Looks healthy.
Yes, you can prune it by the end of Spring, when new growth has 7 or more pair of leaves, trim them to two pairs.
You don't have to drench it, you can water from above till water pours out of the bottom hole.
If it were mine I would put it outdoors.
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Post-repotting Questions! 5 months 2 weeks ago #57551

  • Swanneck
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Thank you both very much. I'm quite stuck for outdoor space for this Chinese Elm. Also the wife has decided she loves it indoors!

May I ask why you both suggested keeping outdoors? And will I be harming it by keeping it indoors?

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Post-repotting Questions! 5 months 2 weeks ago #57552

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In the end the tree will probably die if you keep it inside. That's what happens for most people. Try use the search function in here and you will see how many people who lost their chinese elm for that reason.
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Post-repotting Questions! 5 months 2 weeks ago #57557

  • Ivan Mann
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Swanneck wrote: Thank you both very much. I'm quite stuck for outdoor space for this Chinese Elm. Also the wife has decided she loves it indoors!

May I ask why you both suggested keeping outdoors? And will I be harming it by keeping it indoors?


Biologically plants have a much simpler genome than humans. We can adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions and they can't. Also, we can slap bugs and kill them; they can't. We have immune systems that work fairly well; they don't. This is one reason why the maple tree in the front yard produces thousands of seeds every year and why there aren't any baby maple trees out there.

Your tree evolved outdoors. It has been suited to outdoors live for millions, maybe billions, of years, and it has a hard time adjusting. Yes, you have indoors plants, but they were bred over generations to live indoors while the Chinese elm's immediate ancestors were all outside. Indoors the humidity is much lower and there is less air movement. This allows insects to attack the plant. Indoors there is almost no variability in temperature. The tree expects pretty hot and pretty cold. The tree also expects lots of sunlight, with wavelengths that are blocked window glass.

I have an azalea just covered in flowers right now. My wife thinks it looks beautiful on the kitchen table. Sure, for one day, then back out side it goes, to be replaced by another. So, get a lot more trees, and rotate them. Tell your wife to conform with her wishes you had to get a dozen more trees. Don't forget that you need space outside to keep a dozen. Actually, a dozen might not be enough...........
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Post-repotting Questions! 5 months 2 weeks ago #57559

  • BofhSkull
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Ivan Mann wrote: Tell your wife to conform with her wishes you had to get a dozen more trees. Don't forget that you need space outside to keep a dozen. Actually, a dozen might not be enough...........


Or get her a plastic one. They do pretty realistic ones these days :silly:

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